Things you didn’t know about your dog’s vision

Things you didn’t know about your dog’s vision


Dogs, what do they really see and why protect their Vision

Dogs align their nose to look at you… their Eyes go along for the ride. Their Vision acuteness enables them to see details we miss. A dog’s eyes actually compliment their other senses. They see around us and past us- this is part of their gaze. We, on the other hand stare at them not around them as they do. Dogs see objects and smell objects around and past us.
Physically their eyes are located more peripherally towards their ears – why? for panoramic viewing 270 degrees versus our 180 degrees.
Ever wonder why they can nab a Frisbee with ease; it’s their photoreceptor (rods) that are widely distributed and the speed they are activated for vision. Near objects are secondary interest to them because of this photoreceptor distribution peripherally (near Toys he ignores since he can’t see it).

Our near vision relies on the fovea. This retinal area has millions of photoreceptors (cones) for color vision. A Pug has much less than we; a Greyhound even less. This is why the Pug will retrieve the ball quickly to you on command (he aims to please) while the Great Dane will simply ignore the ball.

All light enters their fixed Pupil size of 3-4mm in diameter. The human eye has a 9mm diameter Pupil size upon full dilation (open) and a very small 1mm pupil constriction (closing) for UV and UVB light.
Unfortunately the dog’s fixed 3-4 mm Pupil allows in all UVB and what’s worse… they get twice that amount than us since light hits their Retina twice (redoubling the image they’re viewing). A dog’s visual system has no natural defenses against UVB radiation nor do we.. hence it “binds” to the DNA (the WHO).

Dog’s are most sensitive to “blue” and “yellow green” light. We, react best to Red, Blue and Green. Guard dogs will attack a Blue or Red object quicker than other colors.. Their days are numbered with the many outdoor activities they endure from the new UVB blue light radiation.

All dog’s see past us and around us. This is part of their gaze. We, on the other hand stare at them, not around them. They see objects and smell objects around and past us.

Signs and Symptoms of Vision Loss
– less reaching, grabbing, pawing, & playing with other dogs
– avoid or don’t react to loud or the smallest noise
– missing a dangerous moment
– lethargic, reluctant walks in the park
– milky Eyes

 Boomers/Seniors Blog

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